Meet the Artist

Anne Perez, Owner and Artist of Raven Eagle Design, LLC

Current Work

Glass Selfie
Glass Selfie
Thanks for visiting my website. Nature inspires my creations in glass. Right now I’m working in series, exploring various themes and ideas. One series involves the movements of herd animals, another is a series of memorials to people and animals who are now spirits. I call that series “Illustrated Souls”. Behind everything I do is my need (read: obsession) to channel light through colored glass.


About Raven Eagle Design

I recently retired from 25 years in the IT industry after discovering it was more fun to play with broken glass. I now pursue my passion for beautiful glass full time and have been blessed to learn from and be mentored by masters like Paul Tarlow, Jody McRaney Rusho and Bob Paterson. Both the art and the chemistry of glass appeal to me. No matter who you are or where you live, take a little time to pursue beauty. It is totally worth the risk.

I am also involved with the local arts community, serving as the Secretary for Glass Gathering, a group of Houston area glass makers. I’m a member of Art League of Fort Bend (who are also my gallery representation), and frequent display artist at Hardy and Nance Studios monthly invitationals. I am also blessed by the tremendous support of my husband, family and friends.

My passion is making kiln-formed glass, jewelry and decor. I became fascinated by light and darkness when living in Alaska. After moving to Texas I began to use fused glass to channel light into art work, creating objects that change with the passing light of the day.


Production Methods
Me at work in my safety gear
Me at work in my safety gear

Glass kiln-forming is a trifecta of artistry, material science and faith in the partnership with one’s kiln. Heat and chemistry come together to make something lovely. It also gives me a great excuse to play with power tools. 🙂 (Can’t you tell I’m grinning in my photo?) Sculpture, jewelry, dishes and games are my favorite things to make.

Production of kiln-formed glass sounds simple enough. Cut glass, stack it, melt it together in the kiln, so that the bits of glass become one. Then run it through the kiln again, this time on a shaping or forming mold to give the glass lift and dimension. Then there is the satisfaction of the final finishing and polishing. Sounds simple, yet I’ve studied this art for years and am still learning new things daily.

Sometimes chemical reactions run wild, bits of stuff from the kiln ceiling can embed into the otherwise perfect surface of a final firing and sometimes I miscalculate kiln speed or temperature causing ugly cracks. Yet every setback makes me a better glassmaker.

Dominoes in production on the bench
Dominoes in production on the bench